Inherit, Inheritance tax, Uncategorized

No Inheritance Tax on estates worth up to £1 million? Not quite!

George Osborne announced the introduction of an additional Inheritance Tax (IHT) Nil Rate Band (NRB) for a person’s main residence in the Summer 2015 Budget. This was good news for with wealth tied up in their family home. The existing NRB of £325,000 per person or £650,000 per couple, on which 40% IHT is not paid, will remain the same. But from 2017/18, an additional Residence Nil Rate Band (RNRB) of £100,000 per person will be introduced, which will increase to: £125,000 in 2018/19; £150,000 in 2019/20; and £175,000 in 2020/21. In 2020/21, this means a house worth £1 million could be passed on tax free. But tax planning is still important, as there are a number of drawbacks you have to avoid in order to make sure you are eligible for the full amount.

Drawback 1 = you need to be married

Spouses* can inherit their other half’s share of an estate tax free so the NRB does not need to be used up. This means the deceased’s £325,000 NRB can transfer to the survivor, who will then have an IHT allowance of £650,000 when they die. The RNRB can also be passed on to the survivor so in 2020/21, this will equal £1 million. Unmarried couples do not have the right to pass on NRBs to each other.

Drawback 2 = only your children can benefit

Spouses who do not have children will miss out on the RNRB. The property must be passed to lineal descendants, such as children (including adopted/foster/stepchildren, children under a guardianship, and their direct descendants) and grandchildren, but not nieces and nephews.

Drawback 3 = the £1 million allowance does not apply now

The allowance will be phased in over the next five years so the £1 million will actually only apply in 2020/21.Drawback 4 = keep your wealth in your home

If you have a large investment portfolio and no house, you cannot benefit from the additional allowance, only the £325,000 NRB. But if your total estate is over £2 million, the RNRB will be tapered away. An estate with a net value of more than £2 million will see the band withdrawn at a rate of £1 for every £2 over the threshold.

Other points to consider

Trusts

The RNRB may be lost where, for example, the property is placed into a discretionary Will trust for the benefit of the children or grandchildren.

Downsizing

The family home does not need to be owned at death to qualify. This helps those who may have downsized or sold their property to move into residential care or a relative’s home. The RNRB will still be available provided that:

  • The property disposed of was owned by the individual and it would have qualified for the RNRB had they retained it;
  • The replacement property and/or assets form part of the estate and pass to descendants;
  • Downsizing or disposal of the property has to take place after 8 July 2015. But there is no time limit on the period between disposal and death.

Multiple residences

Only one residential property will qualify. It will be down to the personal representatives of the estate to nominate which one should qualify if there is more than one. A property which was never the deceased’s residence, e.g. a buy-to-let, cannot be nominated.

*For ease, spouse will refer to civil partner as well.

 

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